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Tax Information


 

 

Tax Information

Since all nonresident international students and scholars (and their dependents) who were physically within the United States must file tax paperwork, this website was developed to offer you some resources to help you file your tax returns or answer tax related questions. 

These resources are not affiliated with the University of Minnesota or International Student and Scholar Services and have not been vetted. Notification of a resource should not be construed as an endorsement by the University of Minnesota. We are aware of these resources, but it is fully any student's responsibility to investigate and choose whether or not to utilize its services.

Some of the resources listed below charge for their services. We recommend that you compare costs prior to making a decision. 

Please be aware that 2020 taxes were due on May 17, 2021.

NRVTAP is no longer responding to email questions or providing support beyond the website resources. However, the member site, TaxSlayer, and all tools, guides, and videos will remain available through June 5. During this time NRVTAP will continue to process new membership requests to enable students to access these resources and prepare their taxes.

ISSS advisors and staff cannot give tax advice or assistance.

How to Determine Your Tax Status

A student or scholar’s tax status may be different from your immigration status. Depending on your tax residency, you may have different tax requirements, exemptions, and forms to complete. For more information on how to determine your tax residency, visit the IRS website, Introduction to Residency Under US Tax Law. The IRS also has a Tax Guide nonresident tax filers. 

In general, students in F or J status are considered nonresident aliens for tax purposes for the first five calendar years of their stay in the US. Scholars in J status are considered nonresident aliens for tax purposes for the first two calendar years of their stay. For help with determining your tax status, you can use the NRVTAP's Residency Tool or a Tax Software (for example, Glacier or Sprintax). 

If you are not sure if you are a resident for tax purposes or a “dual status alien” for tax purposes, according to the IRS Taxation of Dual-Status Aliens webpage: "You are a dual-status alien when you have been both a U.S. resident alien and a nonresident alien in the same tax year."

Tax Documents 

For students who work at the university or receive a scholarship or fellowship may find these resources helpful. 

1042-S

Did you receive a stipend, scholarship, fellowship income, and/or travel grant from UMN during 2020? If so, you will need to have a 1042-S form when preparing your income tax returns.

Please be aware that the UMN will not send these forms until mid-March. If you want to know if you will receive 1042-S, please email ohr@umn.edu to ask. This requirement does not apply to individuals who only received tuition reductions or exemptions.

1098-T

You may have received a 1098-T Tuition Form from the Office of Student Finance. This form does not generally apply to international students and scholars, however, as non-residents are not eligible to claim education expense tax credits.

MN Property Tax Refund

If you rent, you may have received a form regarding the MN Property Tax Refund. Review the information we have compiled from the MN Department of Revenue.

Nonresident Tax Resources & Options

UMN IRS VITA Student Group

Nonresident Volunteer Tax Assistance Program (NRVTAP) - The Nonresident Volunteer Tax Assistance Program (NRVTAP) provides free tax services to qualifying international students and scholars at the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities, Duluth, Crookston, and Rochester campuses. Appointments are given on a first come, first serve basis, and more information about NRVTAP's services can be found at www.nrvtap.com. Video tutorials are also available on the NRVTAP website as a list of office hours.

PLEASE NOTE: If you will receive a 1042-S form, you should schedule an appointment after mid-March (although you can make a reservation now). You will need this form to prepare your taxes, and the University of Minnesota will not be sending 1042-S forms until then.

Tax Preparing Software Options

Most tax softwares can help you determine your tax status, prepare nonresident tax forms for individuals who have not earned income or filing Federal income tax returns. Some tax softwares prepare state returns depending on the company. 

Tax Providers 

  • The Nonresident Tax Help Group - Assist with non-resident tax issues, including federal and state nonresident alien returns, prior year and amended returns, dual-status returns, as well as help to prepare ITIN application forms (although no CAA Services).
  • GW Carter, Ltd Certified Public Accountants - Dual year returns and complicated tax situations for resident and nonresident tax preparers. 

Additional Information

You can also access Sprintax’s resources such as the Sprintax Blog and YouTube Videos that all open for any international student to access covering important topics related to nonresident tax. Sprintax will also offer the following informational webinars that will cover an overview of nonresident tax for international students and scholars to learn more about their filing obligations:

Resident Tax Resources & Options

  • UMN IRS VITA Student Group

  • Volunteer Tax Assistance Program (VTAP) - These clinics should only be used by individuals preparing resident tax returns.

    Tax Vendors/Preparers

    If you are filing as only a resident for tax purposes (not dual status), you should be able to use the tax preparers and vendors that are available to other residents. You could try this IRS tool to see if it is helpful in finding assistance: IRS: Tools for Individual Taxpayers.

    Consulting a Tax Professional

    GW Carter, Ltd Certified Public Accountants - Dual year returns and complicated tax situations for resident and nonresident tax preparers.

    Resources for Dual Status Aliens

  • If you have determined that you are a dual status alien for tax purposes, here are resources.

    If you are not sure if you are a resident for tax purposes or a “dual status alien” for tax purposes, according to the IRS Taxation of Dual-Status Aliens webpage: “You are a dual-status alien when you have been both a U.S. resident alien and a nonresident alien in the same tax year.” You could also try NRVTAP’s residency tool

    Tax Providers for Dual Status Aliens

    • The Nonresident Tax Help Group - Assist with non-resident tax issues, including federal and state nonresident alien returns, prior year and amended returns, dual-status returns, as well as help to prepare ITIN application forms (although no CAA Services).
    • GW Carter, Ltd Certified Public Accountants - Dual year returns and complicated tax situations for resident and nonresident tax preparers.
  • GPS